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Sunday I set out across the Marais, with the idea of revisiting the Promenade plantée below Bastille. I noticed signs, however, for Nomades dans le Haut Marais, an annual art walk in the 3eme arrondisement. I got a map of participating locations and substituted art and exploration of the upper Marais as the day’s new plan. I was familiar with various parts of the district — the Arts et Métiers area, the Square du Temple, and the southeastern corner near the Musée Carnavalet — but I had not explored the upper Marais as thoroughly as I had the lower part. It was a pleasure to weave these spots together and confirm once again how walkable Paris is. Along with some interesting art galleries I stumbled across the oldest house in the city, the Nicholas Flamel house dating from 1407.

Nicholas Flamel House 1407

Nicholas Flamel House 1407

Sunday evening I caught up with Jeff Redding after his world travels for his dinner and a shared bottle of wine.

On Monday I set off again towards the Promenade plantée; this time I got there, and learned something new. The part I had walked several times last year was along the top of a disused railroad viaduct (with artisan’s stores and workshops in the arches). This section ends at the Parc de Reuilly, a mecca for sunbathers.

Parc de Reuilly Sunbathers

Parc de Reuilly Sunbathers

What I hadn’t noticed last year was that another part of the Promenade picks up at the end of the Allée Vivaldi, a short walkway that ends in a courtyard surrounded by modern buildings. It was puzzling to know how to continue until I realized that this last section, instead of being on top of a viaduct, is below grade, in tunnels and shady valleys.

Promenade Tunnel

Promenade Tunnel

A cold which I had been disregarding for several days caught up with me on Tuesday, which I spent babying myself at home. Fortunately I’m feeling much better this morning, though I still plan to take it easy until I’m fully recovered.

Mot du jour: “ado.”  Short for “adolescent,” i.e. “teen.” Colloquial French is showing a strong tendency towards truncating longer words. The members of the Académie Française must be tearing their hair out!